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Filaria Journal

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  1. Content type: Research

    In order to use a combination of ivermectin and albendazole for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis, it is important to assess the potential risk of increased adverse events in individuals infected with bo...

    Authors: William H Makunde, Leo M Kamugisha, Julius J Massaga, Rachel W Makunde, Zakana X Savael, Juma Akida, Fred M Salum and Mark J Taylor

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:15

    Published on:

  2. Content type: Review

    The occurrence of Loa loa encephalopathy following mass treatment of onchocerciasis with Mectizan® has adversely affected onchocerciasis control efforts in central Africa. Persons with very high densities of L. l...

    Authors: David G Addiss, Richard Rheingans, Nana AY Twum-Danso and Frank O Richards

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S9

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  3. Content type: Review

    Reactions are commonly associated with the chemotherapy of onchocerciasis. However unmanageable reactions are uncommon when ivermectin (Mectizan®) is used for the treatment of this infection, and this drug has pr...

    Authors: Charles D Mackenzie, Timothy G Geary and John A Gerlach

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S5

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  4. Content type: Review

    In areas co-endemic for loiasis and onchocerciasis, the classic Community-Directed Treatment using ivermectin (Mectizan®) must be adapted as additional program activities, better communication and tighter control...

    Authors: Nancy J Haselow, Julie Akame, Cyrille Evini and Serge Akongo

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S10

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  5. Content type: Review

    In August 2002, 65 cases of Loa-associated neurological Serious Adverse Events were reported after ivermectin treatment. The first signs, occurring within the 12–24 hours following treatment, included fatigue, ge...

    Authors: Michel Boussinesq, Jacques Gardon, Nathalie Gardon-Wendel and Jean-Philippe Chippaux

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S4

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  6. Content type: Meeting Report

    The occurrence of Serious Adverse Experiences (SAEs) following Mectizan® treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas has been increasingly reported over the past decade. These SAEs include a severely dis...

    Authors:

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S2

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  7. Content type: Review

    Of the 207 Serious Adverse Events (SAEs) following treatment with Mectizan® (ivermectin, Merck, Sharpe & Dohme) that were reported from 1989 to 2001 through the passive SAE surveillance system required of all onc...

    Authors: Nana AY Twum-Danso

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S7

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  8. Content type: Review

    This paper presents a summary of reported cases of Serious Adverse Events (SAEs) following treatment with Mectizan® (ivermectin, Merck, Sharpe & Dohme) in onchocerciasis mass treatment programs from January 1, 19...

    Authors: Nana AY Twum-Danso

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S3

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  9. Content type: Review

    Ivermectin (Mectizan®) is the only drug currently recommended for the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Serious adverse events rarely occur during treatment, except in subjects heavily infected with Loa Lo...

    Authors: Kwablah Awadzi

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2(Suppl 1):S6

    Published on:

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 2 Supplement 1

  10. Content type: Short paper

    The spatial variation of Wuchereria bancrofti and Plasmodium falciparum infection densities was measured in a rural area of Papua New Guinea where they share anopheline vectors. The spatial correlation of W. banc...

    Authors: Neal D Alexander, Rana A Moyeed, Phil J Hyun, Zachary B Dimber, Moses J Bockarie, Julian Stander, Bryan T Grenfell, James W Kazura and Michael P Alpers

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:14

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  11. Content type: Research

    Entomological methods may provide important tools for monitoring the progress of lymphatic filariasis elimination programs. In this study, we compared dissection of the vector, Culex quinquefasciatus, with the po...

    Authors: David S Goodman, Jean-Nicolas Orelus, Jacquelin M Roberts, Patrick J Lammie and Thomas G Streit

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:11

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  12. Content type: Research

    Many filarial nematodes harbour Wolbachia endobacteria. These endobacteria are transmitted vertically from one generation to the next. In several filarial species that have been studied to date they are obligator...

    Authors: Dietrich W Büttner, Samuel Wanji, Chiara Bazzocchi, Odile Bain and Peter Fischer

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:10

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  13. Content type: Research

    The majority of filarial nematode species are host to Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts, although a few including Acanthocheilonema viteae, Onchocerca flexuosa and Setaria equina have been shown to be free of inf...

    Authors: Helen F McGarry, Ken Pfarr, Gill Egerton, Achim Hoerauf, Jean-Paul Akue, Peter Enyong, Samuel Wanji, Sabine L Kläger, Albert E Bianco, Nick J Beeching and Mark J Taylor

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:9

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  14. Content type: Review

    The Onchocerciasis Control Program (OCP) in West Africa has been closed down at the end of 2002. All subsequent control will be transferred to the participating countries and will almost entirely be based on p...

    Authors: Gerard JJM Borsboom, Boakye A Boatin, Nico JD Nagelkerke, Hyacinthe Agoua, Komlan LB Akpoboua, E William Soumbey Alley, Yeriba Bissan, Alfons Renz, Laurent Yameogo, Jan HF Remme and J Dik F Habbema

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:8

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  15. Content type: Research

    Human infection with Wuchereria bancrofti causes a disabling parasitic disease known as lymphatic filariasis, which is a major public health and socio-economic problem in many parts of the world. At the onset of ...

    Authors: Jeevan B Sherchand, Valérie Obsomer, Garib Das Thakur and Marcel Hommel

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:7

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  16. Content type: Research

    Ov-CHI-1 is a chitinase specifically expressed in the infective stage larvae of the human filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus. Evidence has show that it could be a vaccine candidate, however, there is no data a...

    Authors: Yang Wu, Gillian Egerton, James S McCarthy, Thomas B Nutman and Albert E Bianco

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:6

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  17. Content type: Research

    Morbidity management is a core component of the global programme for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis. In a double-blind clinical trial, the tolerability and efficacy of Daflon (500 mg) + DEC (25 mg) or...

    Authors: LK Das, G Subramanyam Reddy and SP Pani

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:5

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  18. Content type: Research

    Ultrasonography is able to detect adult Wuchereria bancrofti worms in scrotal lymphatic vessels of infected men on account of the characteristic pattern of adult worm movements, known as the filarial dance sign. ...

    Authors: Sabine Mand, Yeboah Marfo-Debrekyei, Matthias Dittrich, Kerstin Fischer, Ohene Adjei and Achim Hoerauf

    Citation: Filaria Journal 2003 2:3

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